Far-Left Activist Francesca Paris of NPR Libels Children, Now they Receive Death Threats

Far-Left Activist Francesca Paris of NPR Libels Children, Now they Receive Death Threats

Far-left activist   Francesca Paris   of NPR wrote a false account of events related to a group of teens. Those children are now receiving death threats.

Far-left activist Francesca Paris of NPR wrote a false account of events related to a group of teens. Those children are now receiving death threats.

Far-left activist Francesca Paris libelled a group of children January 19th, 2019. Her story went viral on NPR’s website due to its depiction of a group of Catholic students as racist. Those children are now receiving death threats.

A copy of her libel was sent to Barnes Law, a firm representing the children and parents.

A request for comment was also sent to Francesca, but we have not received a reply.

In an effort to assist Ms. Paris with the most basic of journalistic standards, we’re offering our editing service free of charge below. Our helpful comments can illustrate how her own unfortunate biases can lead to violence toward children. Or perhaps that was her intent?

 A full version of the story may be found at the link below.

https://web.archive.org/web/20190121022321/https://www.npr.org/2019/01/20/686988268/video-of-kentucky-students-mocking-native-american-man-draws-outcry

Diving right into Paris’ libel, we’ll start with the following.

 A crowd of students surrounds the Native American man, laughing and filming on cell phones. One boy, wearing a red Make America Great Again hat, stands just inches away from the man's drum, staring at him with a wide smile.

This first paragraph obviously attempts to establish the child as the villain in the article. Paris implies that the boy stood in front of the Indian, and the reader is meant to grasp that it was the boy who approached Nathan Phillips, the native American man. The reverse is true in reality, it was Phillips who approached the boy and stood in front of him.

Nathan Phillips, an Omaha elder participating in the Indigenous Peoples March, keeps drumming and singing.

The jeers of the students – and Phillips' stoic response – were captured in a video that has sparked widespread criticism and drawn an apology from a Kentucky prep school and diocese.

 The Phillips “response” is an inaccurate portrayal of the situation. It was Phillips who initiated contact with the child, and therefore it would be more accurate to portray Sandmann (the boy) as the stoic character, as he simply stood in the same place during the encounter as Phillips approached.

 

The students and Phillips had both converged in Washington, D.C., last Friday. The students, a group of boys from Covington Catholic High School in Kentucky, were there to attend the March for Life. Phillips had come for the first-ever Indigenous Peoples March, on the same day.

This paragraph is factually true, though use of “converged” implies some sort of hostile takeover. Simply saying arrived would have sufficed as to not give the reader the impression a child did something wrong by visiting the nation’s capital.

Videos show a number of young men and women, predominantly white, jumping, cheering and chanting, in a dense circle around Phillips. Many are wearing Trump paraphernalia, and some are wearing clothing associated with the Covington high school.

 This paragraph is an incorrect assessment of the situation. Phillips approached the children and drew their attention. Behind Phillips is his camera crew and fellow activists. He is not surrounded.

 "I heard them saying, 'Build that wall, build that wall,' " Phillips says in another videoposted to social media, wiping away tears. "This is indigenous lands. You know we're not supposed to have walls here. We never did, for millenniums, before anyone else came here. We never had walls."

 We have seen no evidence of the children chanting this, but none the less we’re happy Paris was able to get comment from her fellow far-left activist.

Another video appears to show Phillips approaching the large group of students. Phillips told MSNBC there was a small group of Black Israelites in the area, exchanging escalating racial taunts with the students, and that he walked in-between the two groups because he feared for the safety of the Black Israelites.

 This is factually inaccurate. There is no evidence that the children “exchanged” racial taunts with the Black Israelites, but there is evidence to suggest the Israelites hurled them at the minors. More context would have been appropriate given the Black Israelites are listed as a hate group in the United States.

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